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Kerrville: Lakehouse Restaurant Review

The Lakehouse Restaurant

Looks can be deceiving.

Ahhh, beautiful Kerrville, Texas…  (Cue Grieg’s Morning Music)

The beautiful, spring-fed waters of the Guadalupe rush quietly through the small town with large swaths of beautiful cypress trees and carefully tended parks.  The area is quiet, but for a few slow-moving cars and birds singing in the distance.  With settings like this, how can one have a bad day?  Deep in the heart of the city, there is something, well not insidious, but distasteful.

I did everything I could to have a good, anniversary dinner.  Researched on Google, compared those reviews with those of other restaurants, even scoped out the place using Google’s Street View.  With all of that research behind me, I knew that The Lakehouse was the best place in town for a good meal.

The Lakehouse Restaurant

The Lakehouse Restaurant

Considering the humble, but beautiful surroundings, I was expecting some really decent diner-style food.  They’re famous for their catfish, but I didn’t order that.  My first mistake…  I’m not a huge catfish fan, mostly because I’ve had it too many times where the breading is soggy and under-salted on a fish that is already barely palatable.  My husband also passed on the catfish.  My husband and I both ordered the 10 oz sirloin, but first – salad and an entire basket of miscellaneous condiments!

The Lakehouse Restaurant

The Lakehouse Restaurant

In case you’re wondering, yes, that picture above is “salad”.  Pre-bagged iceberg and romaine with one tomato slice and pre-mixed ranch dressing.   I have no problem with the typical American house salad, but usually, it at least comes with a generous sprinkling of neon orange cheese, overly garlicked croutons and a cucumber slice, but I wasn’t so lucky with this salad.  The condiment basket was a great idea!  Give the customer everything their little heart could desire.   Okay, this is just a salad, right?  Not a harbinger of what is to come, right?

The Lakehouse Restaurant

Lakehouse Restaurant Texas

Well, everything looks picture perfect!  Except for the steak, and the sauteed mushrooms and onions, the coleslaw and even the beans.  The first cut into my 1/3 inch thick steak revealed a center that was barely pink.  Which is disappointing because I never order steaks warmer than medium-rare.  (I ordered this one rare.)  But to be fair, I don’t think it’s possible to cook a steak rare when it’s that thin.

I took a bite and was stunned by the absolute lack of flavor, even with fresh mushrooms and onions!  There was NO SALT on my steak.  None!  No salt on my husband’s steak.  Needless to say, after that first mouthful, I asked for a bottle of A1.  Almost everything else was pre-made, frozen grossness; detailing every side dish is not necessary (however the fried shrimp were decent).  This terrible meal would have been easier to swallow had the price of my steak been somewhere around Waffle House prices, but my steak cost a hefty $18.99.  WTF!  I can get a a T-bone steak at Waffle House cooked correctly for only $10.00.

The Lakehouse Restaurant

People of Kerrville – you deserve better, cheaper food.  Please go to Bill’s BBQ, where I had the best buttermilk pie ever and melt-in-your-mouth fatty brisket for about the same price.

Completos: Chilean Hot Dogs That Will Change Your Life

Chilean Completos: hot dogs with a twist! This is not your standard American dog with yellow mustard and ketchup. This is the Chilean dog loaded with avocado, lemon-mayo, sauerkraut and tomatoes. How does one write 300 words about hot dogs?  Normally, I would say that you can’t write 200 words on boring, tubed meats, but when it comes to Chilean completos, I could write a novel.  This is not your standard American dog with yellow mustard and ketchup. This is the Chilean dog loaded with avocado, lemon-mayo, sauerkraut and tomatoes. Because Chileans do not make food in half-measures, these amazing ingredients do more than just complement the hot dog, they steal the show.   Everything is fresh and full of flavor.

complement the hot dog, they steal the show.   Everything is fresh and full of flavor.

Chilean Completos: hot dogs with a twist! This is not your standard American dog with yellow mustard and ketchup. This is the Chilean dog loaded with avocado, lemon-mayo, sauerkraut and tomatoes.

Chilean Completos: hot dogs with a twist! This is not your standard American dog with yellow mustard and ketchup. This is the Chilean dog loaded with avocado, lemon-mayo, sauerkraut and tomatoes. I know what you’re thinking, “Alais, this looks like a total gut-bomb.”  And you would be right. This is a complete gut-bomb, but one that is totally worth it.

A couple of things you should know before you decide to eat a Chilean completo:

1. You will not look pretty. (But who cares anyway.)

2. You will need an entire roll of paper towels to wipe your face.

3. You will never look at sauerkraut the same way again.

4. You will not need to eat again for at least 2 days.

Chilean Completos: hot dogs with a twist! This is not your standard American dog with yellow mustard and ketchup. This is the Chilean dog loaded with avocado, lemon-mayo, sauerkraut and tomatoes. In Chile, completos are traditionally served with papas fritas – thick-cut french fries.  This is one gut-bomb too many, so I like to serve mine with fruit.  Something tropical and acidic like mangoes (pictured in the beginning) or pineapple pairs so well and serves as a delicious palette-cleanser.  Also, because you’re still making hot dogs, the typical picnic staples will still feel right at home nestled next to this behemoth.  Once you eat hot dogs this way, you will never go back!  I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

Chilean Completos: hot dogs with a twist! This is not your standard American dog with yellow mustard and ketchup. This is the Chilean dog loaded with avocado, lemon-mayo, sauerkraut and tomatoes.

Chilean Completos
Recipe Type: Entree
Cuisine: American
Author: Alais Petersen
Prep time: 30 mins
Cook time: 20 mins
Total time: 50 mins
Serves: 12
Ingredients
  • 12 hot dogs
  • 12 unsliced bolillo or hoagie rolls
  • 1 16 oz package Boar’s Head sauerkraut
  • 1 tsp granulated sugar
  • 1 cup mayo
  • 2 lemons, juiced
  • 4 large avocados
  • 5 medium vine-ripened tomatoes
Instructions:
  1. Place the hot dogs in a large pot and fill to one inch above the hot dogs with cold water. Turn burner to high heat and bring the hot dogs to a boil. As soon as the pot is at a rolling boil, turn off and let sit.
  2. Place the sauerkraut and sugar in a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a simmer and stir occasionally until all liquid is dissolved. This should take 15-20 minutes.
  3. While the sauerkraut is cooking, start prepping your condiments.
  4. Cut a hole in each bolillo roll. Take care not slice through. You want to make a pocket for hot dog, by keeping the ends intact.
  5. Place mayo in a small bowl and add 2 teaspoons of lemon juice. Whisk until combined.
  6. Peel and dice avocados in a large bowl. Add the rest of the lemon juice to the bowl and take a potato masher and mash until the avocado is a fine paste. Salt to taste.
  7. Chop tomatoes in 1/2 or 1/3 inch pieces and set aside.
  8. To assemble: stuff a drained hot dog into the bolillo roll, then add sauerkraut (as much or little as you want), fill in the entire space between the sauerkraut and the top of the roll with avocado mash (trust me), next top with a large stripe of lemon-mayo, finally top with as much tomato as your heart desires.
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